The White Out

By Letangueray

In recent years, the Penguins have requested that all fans wear white shirts to playoff games, calling this a “White Out.” It’s pretty remarkable to see an arena drenched in white, waving white towels in support of the Pens. It gives the illusion of it snowing almost.

I like the white out better than teams like the Flyers and Capitals who have the fans wear all Orange or Red. Because of typical stadium seat colors, this actually tends to give off a feel like the arena is all empty seats.

Game 1 of the 2011 Playoffs White Out at Consol Energy Center

When the Pens played across the street in the Old Barn, corporate sponsors provided shirts for the White Out. Now that the Pens are at CEC, corporate sponsors are providing rally towels and the Pens are selling Official White Out shirts for $14.99, available at Dick’s Sporting Goods and at Pens Gear stores.  A portion of the proceeds from the shirts are going to the Pens Foundation to support local charities.

Some fans are disatisfied with this for a number of reasons. Among the reasons are:

1. We don’t want to buy the shirts.

2. The away team wears white, so a white out supports the opposition.

3. The Pens colors are black and Vegas gold so we should wear one of those colors.

4. The shirts have Stanley Cups on them which is a jinx.

Okay, who ushered in this new age of Pens fandom where we bitch and complain about absolutely everything and are NEVER satisfied? Do you all realize how frivolous this line of thinking is?

If we are going to be ridiculous then let’s go all out.

You don’t want to pay for a White Out shirt. Some of the profit from the shirts goes to charity, therefore, you hate charity.

The road teams are more likely to win when playing against the Pens because they will feel like it is a home game because they are wearing white, so the home team’s fans must love them as well.

Wearing a Stanely Cup on your shirt will make you not win the Cup because you are saying that you have something that you have not yet won, even though the official logo of the playoffs has a Stanley Cup on it.

You can't have Stanley Cups when you are trying to win the Stanley Cup!

Okay, so we have established that you don’t want to buy a shirt. How about wearing another Pens shirt? Maybe the away jersey or shersey? Oh, wait. You can’t do that. That won’t work. If you wear away gear at a home  game, then you are cheering for your team on the wrong day of the week or you are confused about your location. This will be confusing to all parties involved.

Do you see how absolutely mind-numbingly ludacris these White Out complaints are? When did Pittsburgh go from The City of Champions to The City of Compulsive Whiners?

If you aren’t happy with White Outs, then it is bathroom lines at CEC-because nowhere else in the world will you wait in line for a bathroom when you congregate 18,000 people into one building at a time.

Blackouts won’t work. Marc-Andre Fleury has already stated that the black back drop makes it difficult for him to track the puck. But, just to appease the minority of fans, let’s try a black out and then when Fleury allows infinite goals, you can all leave with 15 minutes left in regulation and complain the entire way home about what a terrible goalie Fleury  is and how they should have played Thiessen (Johnson).

The suggestion came up about doing gold. So all of CEC would look like it was coated in dijion mustard?

I got my White Out shirt. I am happy and proud to wear it.

Awww we're gonna lose now if I wear this!

Does this make me better than other fans? No. What it means is that I don’t sit around looking for ways to twist something that people enjoy just for the sake of being the outlier that feels the need to bemoan everything everyone does.

Can we please just celebrate the Pens making it to the playoffs without all of these off the beaten trail complaints?

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6 responses to “The White Out

  1. Here is another perspective from someone who plays the game.

    Washington and Philadelphia are missing the point of the “White Out” and here’s why. During play, the player with the puck isn’t looking for Jim, Bill, Bob, or what’s his face. You are simply looking for color. The Away teams player has the puck and looks up and sees nothing but a sea of white. It is disorienting, and said player has to take an extra second or two to clearly identify his own players.

    This has two main advantages: 1.) The Pens have that extra second or two to try and make a defensive play against the Away team player with the puck. 2.) When the Pens are trying to zero in on a dark jersey, the white on white contrast makes this a bit easier.

    Speaking from experience, when it comes to looking for your own color on the ice and a different view is impeding what your mind is used to processing, it can be difficult.

    Washington using a “red” out, or Philly doing an “orange” out actually has the opposite effect. Home players look up and see nothing but their own color, they can’t differentiate from their fans and their own players. Now, I’m not foolish enough to think that this works, good or bad, for every single player, but it may bother some.

    From a fan perspective, trying to create a sense of unity amongst them all and making every fan feel like they are the “7th player” on the ice is all well and good, but its a tactical advantage that not everyone is getting.

    I’m a fan of the White Out, and approve. I hope to someday be at a playoff game, showing my support with a shirt that also supports a cause that my team believes in. If you don’t like it, there’s the door.

    • Wow..not that I was one of those anit-white out people,but I never even thought about the player’s vision being effected by a sea of (what the fans are wearing). I mean,it makes since,but it just never crossed my mind..

  2. “..let’s try a black out and then when Fleury allows infinite goals, you can all leave with 15 minutes left in regulation”…Unfortunately those assholes do that anyway…I swear if they leave early during a PLAYOFF game..man…

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